Wildflower Spotting in Mundy Regional Park

A quick guide to help you spot beautiful blooms in Mundy Regional Park.

I don’t like winter. I hate being cold, grey skies make me gloomy and rain turns my hair into something that resembles a tumbleweed. But as a nature lover, I know that winter also has its good side. The creeks and waterfalls start to run, the bush turns a brilliant shade of green, and best of all, the wildflowers come into bloom!

In Western Australia, we’re lucky enough to have an abundance of beautiful wildflowers. While our most rare blooms live in the south west, we city-dwellers shouldn’t feel left out. During winter and spring, there are plenty of beautiful wildflowers you can enjoy in and around Perth. Kings Park and Bold Park are two reliable flower-spotting options within the metro area, but I’m going to start with a favourite of mine – Mundy Regional Park.

Mundy Regional Park

Mundy Regional Park is a narrow strip of bushland that runs along the top of the Darling Scarp in Kalamunda and Lesmurdie, about 40 minutes drive from Perth. Despite its small size, it’s got fantastic city views, is home to Perth’s most popular waterfall, Lesmurdie Falls, and its has bucketloads of wildflowers during spring.

The Wildflowers of Mundy Regional Park

When I go wildflower spotting, I like to know what I’m looking at. It may sound geeky, but I get a kick out of knowing the flowers’ names, whether latin or local.  So with the help of my trusty wildflowers books, I thought I’d put together a bit of guide to help me keep track and help you on your floral adventures.

I’m far from a botanist so this is not a comprehensive guide; it’s just a collection of the most common wildflowers I’ve spotted while exploring Mundy Regional Park. There’s plenty more to discover, in fact new species come into bloom each week!  If you find more, let me know – or better yet, share a photo!

 

Wildflower routes

Mundy Regional Park’s landscape is quite varied: granite outcrops, stretches of gravel, pockets of jarrah and marri forest and damp gullies with pretty little creeks and waterfalls. Each of these areas is home to different flowers, so what species you spot will depend on where you go. Here are few walk trails you can use for your wildflower adventures.

Lesmurdie Falls trail – 2km
This trail takes you to base of Perth’s most popular waterfall and back again – so that means lots of steps! A lookout offers excellent views of valley and the Swan coastal plain. This trail probably has the least amount of flowers due to the granite outcrops and steep valley, but the beautiful waterfall more than makes up for it.
Flowers to spot: Acacia, Hovea, Grevillias, Donkey Orchids, Heath, Coneflower

Palm Terrace Walk –  6.5km
A large loop that offers excellent views and a good hill-climb workout. The trail does skip the Lesmurdie Falls but it’s not hard to incorporate it into your walk – the trail begins a short walk from the base of the waterfall, so follow your nose or the sound of the water.
Flowers to spot: Acacia, Hovea, Grevillias, Donkey Orchids, Heath, Myrtle,  Darwinina , Coneflower

 Lewis Road Walk – 5kms
A trail with great views and a few steep climbs. The gravelly, sandy sections of this trail are some of the best places to spot flowers in the the whole park.
Flowers to spot: Donkey orchids, Fairy Orchids, Stackhousia, Verticordia, Spindly Grevilia and Semaphore Sedge and heaps of the brilliant blue Leschanaultia.

Whistlepipe Gully Trail – 3.5km return.
A popular trail that leads you along a babbling creek to a lovely waterfall that cascades over the ruins of an old house. Rocky, granite outcrops offer excellent orchid spotting opportunities.  Flowers to spot: Hovea, Hibbertia, Grevillias, Donkey Orchids, Heath, Myrtle, Native Wisteria,

Mega Mundy TrailMy favourite, this trail mixes bits from all of the above to create one mega trail that maximises your wildflower spotting chances. ( This is route I’ve created on Strava / GPX map)
Flowers to spot: Hovea, Hibbertia, Grevillias, Donkey Orchids, Heath, Myrtle, Verticordia, Sticky Starflowe, Fringed Lily, Pepper Flower, Darwinia, Bitter Pea , Coneflower

Exploring tip: Almost all of the trails in Mundy Regional Park connect via short fire roads, so if you’ve got the time to explore, you can create your own route without disturbing this wonderful slice of wilderness.