Tag: Kalamunda

The Rocky Pool Walk

rocky pools walk

Rocky Pool – More valleys than you can shake a stick at.

Distance: 5 kms
Where: Kalamunda National Park , 40 minutes from Perth
Time: 1.5 – 2 hours
Difficulty: Moderate. There are VERY steep slopes. Luckily most of them are downhill.
Stuff you’ll need: Hat, sunscreen, water and sturdy enclosed shoes.


Why Do This
With a name like ‘Rocky Pool’, I probably don’t need to explain the main reason to go on this walk. Yes, as you’d expect, you will find waterfalls and rocks pools on this walk during winter, spring and early summer.

Rocky Pool Walk

The Rocky Pool in all of their winter an spring glory.

Rocky Pool in Summer

Rocky Pool after a hot summer.

However, during these drier months, the rocky pools aren’t the only drawcard this walk has to offer. What impressed me during this walk were valley views, or to be more precise, the amount and variety of them. Every time you climb or descend a slope, you’ll discover a new view that will have you reaching for your camera. While these hills are far from mountainous, they’re pretty impressive for a city that has a reputation for being flatter than a pancake.

Rocky Pools Walk

Relax, you only have to walk down this, not up.

Speaking of hills, this walk does have a few slopes that will test your ankle strength. The Rocky Pool Walk is a mix of narrow winding paths and wide fire trails.
Surprisingly, it’s the car-width fire trails that prove to be the most difficult. During the last half of the walk, you’ll come across downhill slopes that seem almost vertical, but don’t worry, if you take it slow, you should be fine. On that note, leave the thongs and ballet flats at home this time – sturdy shoes or boots are a must for this walk.

Besides these few slippery areas, the Rocky Pools walk is moderately easy trail that rewards you with views, pretty rock pools to explore and if our experience is anything to go by, the chance to see a kangaroo or two.

walk trails perth

Skippy and his mate. Neither were the least bit concerned by the two humans stomping on their home turf.

 

 


Map & Directions 

Park at the end of Spring Road, Kalamunda. (Check out my dream home on the left while you’re there.) On this trail you’ll see a bunch of signs; stick to the blue arrows and you should be fine.

The blue arrows are your friends.

The blue arrows are your friends.

1. To begin the walk, take a left up the hill that runs along side the houses.
2. Follow the obvious trail. When you get to the first awesome valley view, you’ll see a path that takes you to the left. Ignore that, keep going straight.
3. Keep following the blue signs and be careful on the slopes!
4. When you reach the bottom of the valley, you’ll notice that the signage gets a bit sketchy.  Head left through the small grove of trees to find a bridge.
5. Cross the bridge and head forwards towards the giant electricity pylons. Follow the track as it veers right.
6. You’ve reached Rocky Pools. Once you’ve finished exploring, ignore the yellow Bibbulmum Track snake signs and keep going forward on the wide trail.
7. You’ll spot some maroon posts. Look for the blue arrow on your right and enter the path that takes you back to your start point. (Half way up the hill, keep an eye out for the giant boulder on your left, it’s a great place to climb and test your fear of heights.)

The Whistlepipe Gully Walk

Whistlepipe Gully: A walk with wildflowers, waterfall and witches…kind of.

Type of activity: Walk
Where: Kalamunda in Mundy NP, About a 35-minute drive from the city.
Distance: 3.5 km
Time: 1-1.5 hours.
Difficulty: Easy. There are a few slippery slopes but I’ve seen fit grandmas tackle this trail with no problems.
Stuff you’ll need: Hat, sunscreen, water, enclosed comfortable shoes.


Whistlepipe Gully Walk

A golden view of one of the many granite rocky outcrops along the Whistlepipe Gully trail.

Why do this:
The Whistlepipe Gully trail is one of my all-time favourite Perth bushwalks. I’ve walked it at least 100 times (seriously, I used to live 5 minutes away as a kid!) and it still hasn’t lost any of its sparkle. There are many reasons why, but one the biggest is that this trail is home to the mysterious ruins of a witch’s house!

Ok…so it’s not really a witch’s house. That’s an urban legend I was told as a kid. The ruins are actually all that is left of a Japanese-style home built by well known architect Wallace Greenham. The home was demolished decades ago due to government planning, or something to that nature.

Whistlepipe Gully

Check out the waterfalls from what used to be a bathroom.

Nonetheless, the ruins are still interesting to see, especially since they’ve now been overtaken with plants, creeks and a small waterfall, which is kind of magical in how-awesome-is-mother-nature sort of way.

To get the most magical bang for your buck, I’d visit Whistlepipe Gully in winter, spring, or very early summer. This is when the creeks and waterfalls are at their best, the wildflowers are in bloom, and that wonderful eucalyptus smell fills the air.

 

flowers at Whistlepipe Gully

The valley fills with wildflowers during spring.

 

Map & Directions


This trail is pretty easy to follow – look for the pink triangle markers on the trees or just follow the creek.

  1. To start, park at the cul-de-sac at the end of Orange Valley Road in Kalamunda.
  2. Take the big, obvious path in front of you down the hill.
  3. You’ll reach a small bridge. From then on, just follow the tracks along either side of the creek to the ruins and back.
  4. Enjoy!